Learning Analytics: Far away, so close.

I’ve been thinking about learning analytics and, while some Unis have managed to solve parts of the problem, I think that we need to confront the complexity of the problem, to explain why it’s so challenging. I break it into five key problems.

  1. Data. We don’t currently collect enough of it to analyse, what we do collect is of questionable value and isn’t clearly tied to mechanisms, and we have not confronted the spectre of what we do with this data when we get it.
  2. Mechanisms linking learning and what is produced. The mechanisms are complex. Students could be failing for any number of reasons, not the least of which is crap staff.  Trying to work out what has happened by looking at outputs is unlikely to help.
  3. Focus. Generally, we measure things to evaluate people. This means that students do tests to get marked and, even where we mix this up with formative work, they tend to focus on the things that get them marks. That’s because it’s how we’ve trained them. This focus warps measurement into an enforcement and judgment mechanism, rather than a supportive and constructive mechanism.
  4. Community. We often mandate or apply analytics as an extension of the evaluation focus above. This means that we don’t have a community who are supported by analytics, we have a community of evaluators and the evaluated. This is what we would usually label as a Panopticon, because of the asymmetrical application of this kind of visibility. And it’s not a great environment for education. Without a strong community, why should staff go to the extra effort to produce the things required to generate more data if they can’t see a need for it? This is a terribly destructive loop as it requires learning analytics to work and be seen as effective before you have the data to make learning analytics work!
  5. Support. When we actually have the data, understand the mechanism, have the right focus and are linked in to the community, we still need the money, time and other resources to provide remediation, to encourage development, to pay for the technology, to send people to places where they can learn. For students and staff. We just don’t have that.

I think almost all Unis are suffering from the same problems. This is a terribly complex problem and it cannot be solved by technology alone.

It’s certainly not as easy as driving car. You know that you make the car go faster by pushing on one pedal and you make it go slower by pushing on another.  You look at your speedometer. This measures how often your wheels are rotating and, by simple arithmetic, gives you your speed across the road. Now you can work out the speed you want to travel at, taking into account signs, conditions and things like that. Simple. But this simple, everyday, action and its outcomes are the result of many, many technological, social and personal systems interacting.

The speedometer in the car is giving you continuously available, and reasonably reliable, data on your performance. You know how to influence that performance through the use of simple and direct controls (mechanism). There exists a culture of driver training, road signage and engineering, and car design that provides you with information that ties your personal performance to external achievement (These are all part of support, focus and community). Finally, there are extrinsic mechanisms that function as checks and balances but, importantly, they are not directly tied to what you are doing in the car, although there are strong causative connections to certain outcomes (And we can see elements of support and community in this as we all want to drive on safe roads, hence state support for this is essential).

We are nowhere near the car scenario with learning analytics right now. We have some measurements of learning in the classroom because we grade assignments and mark exams. But these are not continuous feedback, to be consulted wherever possible, and the mechanisms to cause positive change in these are not necessarily clear and direct. I would argue that most of what we currently do is much closer to police enforcement of speed. We ask students to drive a track and, periodically, we check to see if they’re doing the correct speed. We then, often irrevocably from a grading sense, assign a mark to how well they are driving the track and settle back to measure them again later.

Learning analytics faces huge problems before it reaches this stage. We need vast quantities of data that we are not currently generating. Many University courses lack opportunities to demonstrate prowess early on. Many courses offer only two or three measurements of performance to determine the final grade. This trying to guess our speed when the speedo only lights up every three to four weeks after we have pressed a combination of pedals.

The mechanisms for improvement and performance control in University education are not just murky, they’re opaque. If we identify a problem, what happens? In the case of detecting that we are speeding, most of us will slow down. If the police detect you are speeding, they may stop you or (more likely) issue you a fine and eventually you’ll use up your licence and have to stop driving. We just give people low marks or fail them. But, combine this with mechanism issues, and suddenly we need to ask if we’re even ready to try to take action if we had the analytics.

Let’s say we get all the data and it’s reliable and pedagogically sensible. We work out how to link things together. We build  community support and we focus it correctly. You run analytics over your data. After some digging, you discover that 70% of your teaching staff simply don’t know how to do their jobs. And, as far as you can see, have been performing at this standard for 20 years.

What do you do?

Until we are ready to listen to what analytics tell us, until we have had the discussion of how we deal with students (and staff) who may wish to opt out, and until we have looked at this as the monstrous, resource-hungry, incredibly complex problem that it is, we really have to ask if we’re ready to take learning analytics seriously. And, given how much money can be spent on this, it’s probably better to work out if we’re going to listen before we invest money into a solution that won’t work because it cannot work.


2 Comments on “Learning Analytics: Far away, so close.”

  1. Mike Sharkey says:

    Nick — good post, and I think the car analogy is relevant when you think of “learning” as the goal in the same way that “arriving at your destination” is the car’s goal. However, I believe that if you shift the analogy, then you will find a viable application for analytics. Think of “having a safe and smooth ride” as the car goal and “having a successful academic experience” as the learner’s goal. Using this context, the analytics analogy for the car looks like this:

    “Hey…I’m hearing a sputtering noise from the engine as I’m driving down the road. I don’t know if I put in a bad tank of gas, if my fuel injector is clogged, if my tires are shot, or something else. All I know is that I’d better take my car in for a checkup before things go bad”.

    Learning analytics can be used in the same way. Student and classroom data can be used to raise a flag indicating that the student is exhibiting signs of risk. We most likely won’t know the root cause of the risk (academic, social, financial, etc.), but we can create an alert and intervene with the hopes of addressing whatever is amiss before things get too bad.

    Like

    • nickfalkner says:

      Hi Mike,

      Thanks for the comment! Yes, there are many ways to make it work in the classroom, and I use some of them myself, but I’m looking at the problem of making this work at the scale of the University I work for. That’s getting a mechanism and a culture that will work for over 27,000 students and 3,000 staff and that’s where I see some of the real problems coming in.

      When I do something in my class, I’ve implicitly agreed that action may result from what I discover. When we try to do this at a ‘campus’ scale, we develop resource, social and political problems that make this a much more complex proposal.

      Thanks again!
      Nick.

      Like


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